Training & Recruitment

How can nurses and carers progress their careers?

Michael Johnson-Ellis of Healthier Recruitment on career progression for nurses

Michael Johnson-Ellis, one of the managing directors of Healthier Recruitment – an agency that fills vacancies for NHS, private and third sector healthcare organisations with permanent staff only – discusses career development…

With services under pressure, tighter budgets and a lack of staff and resources, many nurses and carers report feeling stunted with regard to professional development. However, there are a number of things you can do to progress your career regardless of the external situation.
Here are some potential pathways to development:

Society’s social care training benefits residents and staff alike

Royal Alfred's Anne Kasey on social care training

Anne Kasey, Home Manager and Clinical Lead for maritime charity, the Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society, discusses the importance of investing in training in the social care sector and how it benefits residents…

It doesn’t matter which sector one operates in – having the right staff for the job is paramount to the success of any business. In the social care industry, this is more important than anywhere as staff are fundamental to the health and wellbeing of residents and have a duty of care to fulfil. 

Safeguarding: steps to identify if a child is in a high-risk environment

Safeguarding in healthcare - a nurse talks to a child

Healthcare professionals will be well aware that identifying when a child is in a high-risk environment is a crucial step in taking action to safeguarding against both abuse and neglect.

There are over 600,000 children in the UK who are living in what is described as a “high-risk” environment. This is a crisis within our child welfare services; therefore, the government is providing £17m of additional funding to inspire organisations like yours to modernise child services by improving information sharing across safeguarding organisations.

How can employers in the care industry accommodate changing staff demands?

A staff nurse with a patient

Staff shortages within the healthcare industry continues to be a hot topic in the news as of late, with many employers finding it difficult to not only attract new members of staff, but also, retain existing ones.

This means that employers in this industry need to be on the ball to attract and keep the most talented, hard-working individuals.

Acting now to improve dementia care

Acting now to improve dementia care

By Jill Whittaker, managing director of Connect2Care, discusses how investing in apprentices can help improve dementia care

More than 500,000 people in the UK are currently thought to be living with dementia and this figure is rising year-on-year[1]. In fact, the number of people living with the illness is predicted to increase by an astounding 281% in 2050, compared to 2015 figures[2]. Despite the growing number of cases, it’s estimated that one in three care workers have received no formal dementia training[3].

Apprenticeships: How to engage with Generation Z

Apprenticeships: How to engage with Generation Z

Recruitment and retention are major concerns within the health and care sector, but professionals are being urged to tap into the talents of Generation Z to ensure top-quality staff are on-hand to plug the growing skills gap. Connect2Care, the leading provider of training and apprenticeships in the Care Sector, discusses ways employers can reduce this gap by boosting engagement with young apprentices. 

Industry shortlist honour for local care force

Industry shortlist honour for local care force

Healthcare staffing agency Local Care Force, which has offices in Manchester, Sheffield and Leeds, has been shortlisted for a prestigious Nursing Times award in Improved Patient Safety.

Local Care Force is the only agency to be shortlisted across all categories and over 200 entries, and is up against large healthcare institutions such as the NHS and Virgin Healthcare.

Created in 2004 by former healthcare professional Leanne Silverwood, Local Care Force supplies workers to the nursing, healthcare and social care sectors. The agency has 50 staff, comprised of recruiters, medical professionals and medical trainers.

NHS reports huge drop in overseas nurses

NHS reports huge drop in overseas nurses

The number of foreign nurses joining the NHS has plummeted, according to latest figures.

Recruitment specialist Randstad highlighted the NHS recruitment drop which has seen EU nurses applying to the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) fall by 96%.

The fall has been blamed on poor working conditions, including long hours and inadequate pay, as well as the introduction of tough new language tests for foreign nursing staff.

Apprenticeships: the key to tackling the skills gap

care apprenticeships 1

Jill Whittaker (pictured), Managing Director of Conntect2Care, the leading training and apprenticeship provider in the care sector, explains the benefits of investing in apprenticeships.

“Recruiting and retaining staff in the care and nursing sector has never been more important. According to Skills for Care, just under 340,000 social care employees leave their job each year. To put this into perspective, on any one day there are 90,000 vacancies for social care jobs in England. Apprenticeships may be the way to address this problem.

The importance of recruiting effectively in the care sector

The importance of recruiting effectively in the care sector

It has never been more important to recruit effectively in the care sector, says care home specialist Caresolve.

James Parkin, Co-founder and Operations Director of Caresolve, says many care homes find it difficult to find – and keep - high quality care staff whether that’s registered manager, senior carers or ancillary staff.

He says: “It is a common problem around the country because demand for good quality staff far outweighs supply at present in the care home sector.

“It means that it has never been more essential to retain your staff once you’ve recruited them.

New care home facility set to bring 90 jobs to Edinburgh

New care home creates 90 jobs in Edinburgh

A new care home facility will bring 90 jobs to Scotland's capital when it opens its doors this winter. 

Due to open in January 2018, Cramond Residence in North West Edinburgh will be recruiting care teams comprising nurses, dementia team leaders and carers at various grades, activity coordinators, catering, housekeeping, and other support staff.

Managed exclusively by Walker Healthcare, Cramond Residence will offer the finest in person-centred nursing and residential care for older people, in luxurious and comfortable surroundings. 

Wiltshire Farm Foods launches BDA endorsed training

Wiltshire Farm Foods, the UK’s number one provider of home-delivered frozen meals, has launched its first British Dietetic Association (BDA) approved CPD training course for healthcare professionals.
 
The free two-hour training course, on the subject of Good Nutrition for Older Adults, is written by Wiltshire Farm Foods’ Registered Dietitian Helen Willis, endorsed by the British Dietetic Association and delivered by Registered Dietitian Sue Baic.

You’ve been hired!

Angela Hurrell considers applicants

When it comes to recruiting new staff, a care group is championing the ongoing involvement of people who use its services in the decision-making process.

 

Regard invites the people they support to sit in on face to face job interviews for staff vacancies as part of a process to identify the best candidate for the role.

 

Along with care users, the service has put together a set of questions and illustrations as pointers as to the kind of questions they might want to ask.

 

At Beudygwyn Farm residential service near Anglesey, Brian Williams, 56, who has an Acquired Brain Injury, played a role in recruiting a new support worker.

 

Preparation is key to creating a stronger healthcare sector

Care suite

A shortage of healthcare professionals is one of the major issues facing today’s National Health Service.

According to recent research by the Royal College of Nurses and Royal College of Midwives, the country requires a further 20,000 nursing staff and 3,500 more midwives to keep pace with increasing demand. Meanwhile, as between seven and ten percent of doctor posts remain vacant, it has also been estimated that by 2025, our ageing population will necessitate an additional 275,000 jobs in the adult social care sector.