music

Music study investigates communication in people living with dementia

Chelsea Court music therapy - Derek and the team are behind the dementia therapy research

Chelsea Court Place, a residential home for individuals living with dementia, is working with the University of Roehampton in a research project entitled Beyond Words, which uses ‘micro-songs’ to recapture and sustain functional language in people with advanced dementia.

The study aims to investigate the power of music, enabling people living with dementia to retain their speech and help communicate their wishes and needs for a longer period than would be normally be the case in the natural deterioration caused by the disease. 

Music all in a day's work at Balhousie Care Group

Patsy from Balhousie Care Group dancing to music

It's not a bad day at work when you spend a large part of it listening to your favourite song tracks. But that's just how Balhousie Care Group employees spent a day recently when they learned the benefits of music to people living with dementia.

Sixteen care home staff from across the award-winning group gathered in Balhousie Monkbarns in Arbroath - one of Balhousie Care's 25 homes across Scotland - to receive their latest training in the popular Playlist for Life, a programme launched by broadcaster Sally Magnusson for use in care homes, hospitals and the community.

Dementia research programme investigates the power of music

dementia research Chelsea Court Place

A dementia research programme at a residential care home is investigating the power of music and whether it can be used to sustain language in older people. Chelsea Court Place has collaborated with the University of Roehampton to launch the exciting music project, called Beyond Words. 

Researchers Prof. Adam Ockelford, Dr Fiona Costa, PhD student Caitlin Shaughnessy and “savant” pianist Derek Paravicini – who is blind and held his first concert at the age of seven – are leading this this innovative project with residents from Chelsea Court Place. 

Improving quality of life with dance

Improving quality of life with dance

Recent studies reveal an increasing number of health benefits from dance – particularly for dementia sufferers.

Clifden House, a leading dementia care centre in Seaford, advocates dance as a therapy. Dance, in any form, not only requires physical movement but also involves important cognitive stimulation. The mental and physical coordination required to dance stimulates several regions of the brain.

Nial Joyce of Clifden House said, “Life doesn’t have to stop with a dementia diagnosis. Finding fun and active activities liked dancing is proven to improve well-being and is a great way to take part in light exercise, provide cognitive stimulation and promote social interaction with others.

Music For The Brain

Music For The Brain

Singing has been proven to play a special role in dementia care and one Sussex care home has capitalised on music’s therapeutic effects by partnering with Alzheimer’s initiative - Singing for the Brain.
 
Clifden House, specialist dementia care centre in Seaford, started holding a daily singing group for residents after learning about the work of Chreanne Montgomery-Smith, of the Alzheimer's Society.
 
Chreanne devised Singing for the Brain sessions in 2003 after noticing that even though other memories may be hard to retrieve for a person with dementia, music is actually easy to recall.
 

Sanctuary Care embraces Silver Sunday

Silver_Sunday

There will be live music, toe tapping, hands clapping, fabulous finery and an abundance of mouth-watering food when Sanctuary Care homes across the country embrace Silver Sunday.

On Sunday 2 October, Sanctuary Care’s care homes will be hosting tea dances for its residents and guests from their local communities.

Silver Sunday is a national day celebrating older people, where local communities and organisations host free events to help combat loneliness and reduce isolation. It was started four years ago by Westminster City Council and the Sir Simon Milton Foundation, an organisation which supports disadvantaged young people and isolated older people in the city.

New Project Is Music To The Ears Of Bield Tenants

New Project Is Music To The Ears Of Bield Tenants

Service users and their families at some of Bield’s care homes in Fife are set to join a pioneering project that uses music to improve the quality of life for those living with dementia.

Bield’s Gillie Court and Grants Bank in Dunfermline and Finavon Court in Glenrothes will be the first to implement the scheme, Playlist for Life, which was started, and is still based, in Scotland to help ease the symptoms of dementia.

Thanks to funding from the Scottish Government’s People and Communities Fund, the developments will make use of iPads, iPods and headphones to enable tenants, their families and staff to build up a playlist of familiar and meaningful songs from their past.